Letters From the Editor

December 2018

Dear Colleague,

Welcome to the December 2018 edition of our Updates for the Advanced Practitioner in Oncology: Side-Effect Management for Hematologic Malignancies newsletter. This month, we highlight the latest news from the 2018 American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting, including new data on ruxolitinib’s role in treating steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease, the effect of ibrutinib dose reduction on progression-free survival in patients with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, and the immune-mediated toxicities associated with nivolumab/ipilimumab combination therapy in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

We also explore two new FDA drug approvals in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) for patients—glasdegib and venetoclax—and a warning from the FDA about potentially serious side effects of enasidenib for patients with AML. Additionally, we spotlight articles on treating hemolytic anemia associated with rasburicase and employing dose-escalation of ruxolitinib to combat adverse events in patients with myelofibrosis.

If you haven’t yet, make sure to watch our latest roundtable discussion, “Management of Adverse Events of Therapy in Hematologic Malignancies: A Case-Based Series and Overview,” during which three expert colleagues and I review important issues and perspectives in managing side effects for hematologic malignancies.

As always, I hope all of these resources equip you with practical strategies for managing the various adverse effects of therapy for hematologic malignancies. Feel free to share this valuable resource with your colleagues. You can also contact me with comments or suggestions at any time through the JADPRO editors at editor@advancedpractitioner.com.

 

Allyson Price, MPAS, PA-C

Physician Assistant, Department of Leukemia

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

 

 

November 2018

Dear Colleague,

Welcome to the November 2018 edition of our Updates for the Advanced Practitioner in Oncology: Side-Effect Management for Hematologic Malignancies newsletter. This month, we highlight news and research on the impact of cancer-related fatigue in patients with multiple myeloma (MM), and reproductive side effects of modern chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma.

We also explore research on the safety and efficacy of carfilzomib-based regimens in MM and Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia and the link between hypertriglyceridemia and polymorphisms in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma receiving bexarotene therapy. Additionally, we spotlight two recent articles on survival and healthcare costs associated with hydroxyurea therapy in patients with polycythemia vera, as well as disease-associated thrombotic events.

Also make sure to watch our roundtable discussion, “Management of Adverse Events of Therapy in Hematologic Malignancies: A Case-Based Series and Overview,” during which three expert colleagues and I review important issues and perspectives in managing side effects for hematologic malignancies. As always, I hope all of these resources equip you with practical strategies for managing the various adverse effects of therapy for hematologic malignancies.

Feel free to share this valuable resource with your colleagues. You can also contact me with comments or suggestions at any time through the JADPRO editors at editor@advancedpractitioner.com.

 

Allyson Price, MPAS, PA-C

Physician Assistant, Department of Leukemia

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

 

September 2018

Dear Colleague,

Welcome to the September 2018 edition of our Updates for the Advanced Practitioner in Oncology: Side-Effect Management for Hematologic Malignancies newsletter. This month, we provide new links to the latest news and journal articles in this treatment space, featuring:

  • The management of side effects before and after stem cell transplant, including a new warning about the use of azithromycin for bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, the potential benefits of light therapy for depression, and the effect of nonmyeloablative/reduced-intensity conditioning on mucositis
  • Recent data on the optimal amount of bedrest after intrathecal chemotherapy for hematologic cancers and how ruxolitinib dose-escalation may help decrease side effects for patients with myelofibrosis.
  • Studies on the safety profiles of treatments for Waldenström macroglobulinemia and smoldering multiple myeloma
  • Discussion of nephrotoxicity in CAR T-cell therapy and updated antifungal prophylaxis guidelines from the European Conference on Infections in Leukemia

If you haven’t yet, check out our new roundtable discussion, “Management of Adverse Events of Therapy in Hematologic Malignancies: A Case-Based Series and Overview.” Navigating through four case studies on thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, and prophylaxis, three expert colleagues and I discuss important issues in managing side effects for hematologic malignancies and provide our own perspective and insight. We hope our discussion and all of our other resources empower you with practical strategies for managing the various adverse effects of therapy for hematologic malignancies.

Feel free to share this valuable resource with your colleagues. You can also contact me with comments or suggestions at any time through the JADPRO editors at editor@advancedpractitioner.com.

 

Allyson Price, MPAS, PA-C

Physician Assistant, Department of Leukemia

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

 

August 2018

Dear Colleague,

Welcome to the August 2018 edition of our Updates for the Advanced Practitioner in Oncology: Side-Effect Management for Hematologic Malignancies newsletter. This month, we’re excited to share with you our new roundtable discussion, “Management of Adverse Events of Therapy in Hematologic Malignancies:
A Case-Based Series and Overview.” I am joined by three expert colleagues as we highlight important issues in managing side effects for hematologic malignancies. Using four individual case studies, we discuss the effective management of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) during prolonged thrombocytopenia, and neutropenia and infection prophylaxis in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies.

Also in this month’s newsletter, we provide links to recent news and research articles highlighting the latest in side-effect management strategies for hematologic malignancies from recent oncology meetings, including HOPA, ASCO, and EHA. We explore updates and emerging data on several novel therapies, including FDA approval of ivosidenib—a new IDH1 inhibitor—in relapsed/refractory, IDH+ acute myeloid leukemia (AML), safety profiles of PI3Kδ inhibitors, and predicting neurotoxicity in CAR T-cell therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We also highlight discussions of fungal prophylaxis, renal toxicity, and neutropenia.

We hope these resources equip you with practical strategies for managing the various adverse effects of therapy for hematologic malignancies, resulting in optimized patient outcomes and improved clinical approaches.

Feel free to share this valuable resource with your colleagues. You can also contact me with comments or suggestions at any time through the JADPRO editors at editor@advancedpractitioner.com.

 

Allyson Price, MPAS, PA-C

Physician Assistant, Department of Leukemia

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

June 2018

Dear Colleague,

As the number of treatment options for hematologic malignancies continues to grow, so does the list of potential side effects resulting from these evolving therapies. It is imperative that we continue educating ourselves on recognizing and properly managing them.

To further the conversation on this important topic, we’ve created Updates for the Advanced Practitioner in Oncology: Side-Effect Management for Hematologic Malignancies. This educational newsletter and website contain news and research articles highlighting the latest in management strategies. In our next edition, we’ll present an upcoming video roundtable discussion I’m holding with three expert colleagues on pressing issues in this area.

Through this initiative, we hope to spur discussion among advanced practitioners and equip you with practical strategies for managing the various adverse effects of therapy for hematologic malignancies—all in an effort to optimize patient outcomes and improve clinical approach.

Be on the lookout for our next edition in the coming months, and in the meantime, feel free to share this valuable resource with your colleagues. You can also contact me with comments or suggestions at any time through the JADPRO editors at editor@advancedpractitioner.com.

Allyson Price, MPAS, PA-C
Physician Assistant, Department of Leukemia
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center